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Meet the Designer: Upcycled Hall

Posted on Aug 17, 2015 by

If you read our second issue, you will already recognise these unusual steampunk designs as the work of Upcycled-Hall, a small and personal business that creates ‘individual, unique and bespoke pieces of home furnishings’. We spoke to Upcycled-Hall’s creator Chip Hall to rack his brain on all things upcycled!

Chip Hall from Upcycled Hall, talks to Warehouse Home about his love of steampunk and creating industrial creations

Meet the man behind Upcycled Hall’s steampunk designs, Chip Hall
Image courtesy of www.facebook.com/upcycledhall

What prompted you to launch Upcycled Hall?

It all started when I was introduced to steampunk and industrial style designs by a friend. I work in the engineering industry and love to ‘tinker’, so I immediately found some of these industrial designs fascinating. I loved the fact that most of the parts were recycled, each with its own unique history, signs of wear and tear … and potential. I created my Facebook page, called Upcycled-Hall, a combination of what I do and my last name, Hall. As with most ‘upcyclers’, Upcycled-Hall is about producing new usable items from unusable waste, industrial waste in my case.

How do you stay inspired, and how do you come up with ideas for your next products?

Most of my inspiration (and scrap parts) comes from where I work, a glass bottle factory, where I see the items I use for my upcycling on a daily basis. My ideas normally come from researching the item requested by a client on the internet, to pick out the key parts and see if I can reproduce them using industrial parts. I think my work probably differs from other industrial upcyclers as I always try to make the pieces look like they are actual working machines with working parts.

Upcycled Hall's lamps are designed from the mind of an engineer, being inspired by a mixture of parts that Chip Hall comes across during his day job

Chip’s engineering background is what makes his lamps so interesting, being made with a mixture of parts that he comes across during his day job
Image courtesy of www.facebook.com/upcycledhall

What prompted you to launch Upcycled Hall?

It all started when I was introduced to steampunk and industrial style designs by a friend. I work in the engineering industry and love to ‘tinker’, so I immediately found some of these industrial designs fascinating. I loved the fact that most of the parts were recycled, each with its own unique history, signs of wear and tear … and potential. I created my Facebook page, called Upcycled-Hall, a combination of what I do and my last name, Hall. As with most ‘upcyclers’, Upcycled-Hall is about producing new usable items from unusable waste, industrial waste in my case.

How do you stay inspired, and how do you come up with ideas for your next products?

Most of my inspiration (and scrap parts) comes from where I work, a glass bottle factory, where I see the items I use for my upcycling on a daily basis. My ideas normally come from researching the item requested by a client on the internet, to pick out the key parts and see if I can reproduce them using industrial parts. I think my work probably differs from other industrial upcyclers as I always try to make the pieces look like they are actual working machines with working parts.

Being an engineer has inspired the industrial, steampunk designs by Chip Hall of Upcycled Hall!

Upcycled Hall’s designs are inspired by Chip’s day job as an engineer!
Image courtesy of www.facebook.com/upcycledhall

What has been your favourite project so far?

My favourite project is also my most complicated piece so far, made for a lecturer at the Royal College of Art. It was for his son’s 21st birthday and I was asked to make a lamp with operational parts. I made a lamp with a valve, which increased the pressure on a gauge and also operated the light. It also had an old water meter on it that I altered to read his date of birth, with a gauge/clock.

What advice would you give to aspiring designers?

For anybody who would like advice on making these kinds of items, I would first of all decide what it is you want to make, then find a source for the parts, such as local factories, engineers’ yard, scrap yard and electricians, then try to find parts that mirror what you’re trying to make. It does help a lot if you can use the skills and tools that you use in your everyday job too, which is the main reason I can do what I do – it comes as second nature!

Keep up to date with Upcycled-Hall’s creations via Facebook and Twitter.
You can also read our feature on Upcycled Hall in Warehouse Home Issue 2 (page 29).

On the lookout for more Steampunk-inspired designs? Visit our dedicated Pinterest board! Follow My Warehouse Home’s board Style: Steampunk on Pinterest.

Finally, keep up to date with our latest features by following MWH with Bloglovin

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