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Real Homes: Butlers and Colonial Wharf

Posted on Feb 22, 2017 by

“The very first time I saw Butlers Wharf, I fell in love. I instantly knew that it was a fantastic development opportunity. Curiously, I spotted it from the river in the summer of 1981 on a cruise along the Thames for an office party. You have to remember that in those days Butlers Wharf was a pretty desolate area. There was little reason to visit other than for the views of Tower Bridge. But the moment I saw these wonderful derelict warehouses on the south bank of the Thames, the party was over for me. My mind was doing cartwheels over the possibilities, which were just beginning to formulate in my imagination. The next day, I raced over to visit the site. I was overwhelmed and quite smitten by the rough and robust Victorian industrial architecture. The waterfront buildings and the streets behind had been used to grind and store spices and the air was still richly fragrant with their smells.” – Sir Terence Conran

Once the largest warehouse complex on the Thames, this weeks search for inspiring industrial interiors brings us to neighbouring Butlers and Colonial Wharf. Falling into decline following its closure in 1972, Butlers Wharf now stands strong along the riverside; a sensitive restoration transforming the property into a wealth of shops, restaurants, offices and homes. Join us as we step inside this two bedroom residential conversion, recently sold via Cluttons for a cool £1.2M.

Rough and robust, these distinctive iron bridges were once used to transport goods between warehouses.

This weeks search for inspiring industrial interiors brings us to neighbouring Butlers and Colonial Wharf

This weeks search for inspiring industrial interiors brings us to neighbouring Butlers and Colonial Wharf
Image via Rightmove.co.uk

An open kitchen and dining space unfolds elegantly against the building’s original features such as exposed brickwork, wooden beams, trusses and loading bay doors.

An open kitchen and dining space unfolds elegantly against the building’s original features

An open kitchen and dining space unfolds elegantly against the building’s original features
Image via Rightmove.co.uk

Tiered glass pendants are a welcomed contrast to unfinished timbers and heavy industrial elements.

Within the space the building’s original features, such as exposed brickwork, wooden beams, trusses and loading bay doors, remain

Within the space the building’s original features, such as exposed brickwork, wooden beams, trusses and loading bay doors, remain
Image via Rightmove.co.uk

Here in the bedroom dappled light dances against raw brickwork while layers of texture help create an even balance of past and present.

Here in the bedroom dappled light dances against raw brickwork

Here in the bedroom dappled light dances against raw brickwork
Image via Rightmove.co.uk

Terence Conran has masterminded the restoration and redevelopment of many of London’s most iconic warehouses. Read his exclusive recount for Warehouse Home here.

Read Warehouse Home Issue Five here! The latest issue of the internationally renowned Warehouse Home magazine is live online and can be enjoyed in full and entirely free. Read Warehouse Home Issue Five by clicking here or view in the reader below.

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