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3 Warehouse Conversions in Clerkenwell

Posted on Feb 23, 2017 by

After the Industrial Revolution, London’s Clerkenwell quickly became a hub of breweries, distilleries and the centre of the watchmaking and printing industries. But, with the decline of industry following the Second World War, many of the area’s old industrial buildings were abandoned. Today the area is a thriving metropolitan hub of bars and restaurants and has attractive many working in the creative industries to take up residence. With only days until London’s Clerkenwell Design Week takes off, and in celebration of the launch of the debut Warehouse Home Book book which features properties from the area, we share three of our favourite Clerkenwell conversions.

1. The Shoe Factory
Angus Pond Architects

The only details remaining from this shoe factory’s past were its windows and a set of metal fire doors dating from 1938. The sturdy industrial features informed materials and colours used throughout the residence. The perfectly formed open-plan kitchen is an elegant stage for entertaining. It features the preserved fire doors, repurposed to conceal a cupboard.

A perfectly formed open kitchen is an elegant stage for entertaining. We unveil the debut Warehouse Home coffee table book published by Thames & Hudson. Pre-order on Amazon today

The preserved fire doors were repurposed to cleverly conceal a cupboard
Image courtesy of Angus Pond Architects | Photography by Ed Reeve

2. Clerkenwell Loft
Inside Out Architecture

Commissioned to redesign this loft in Clerkenwell, Inside Out Architecture stripped it back to its basic structure, revealing a concrete ceiling with geometric ceiling beams. A modern lighting track complements the angular forms.

The large-scale concrete ceilings of industrial conversions are a dramatic feature that can radically influence lighting and decorative choices

The large-scale concrete ceilings of industrial conversions are a dramatic feature that can radically influence lighting and decorative choices
Image courtesy of Inside Out Architecture | Photography by Jim Stephenson

3. Clerkenwell Cooperage
Chris Dyson Architects

This former brewery cooperage is believed to date from the 1900s. Chris Dyson Architects extended its basement to create an open living space that leads into a triple-height atrium.

An elongated fireplace emphasises the soaring height of this unique London property

An elongated fireplace emphasises the soaring height of this unique London property
Image courtesy of Chris Dyson Architects | Photography by Peter Landers

This feature was inspired by the debut Warehouse Home Book published by Thames & Hudson! Enjoy it? Why not register to attend Clerkenwell Design Week 23rd – 25th of May!

 

Read Warehouse Home Issue Five here! The latest issue of the internationally renowned Warehouse Home magazine is live online and can be enjoyed in full and entirely free. Read Warehouse Home Issue Five by clicking here or view in the reader below.

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